Home > Writing > A View of the End of Los Angeles: Wallace Gets a Clue

A View of the End of Los Angeles: Wallace Gets a Clue

When Rob Wallace steps out of his house to pick up the morning paper one morning, this is the view he expects to see. Unfortunately, what he gets is totally different. From Dead in L.A.:

It wasn’t until Los Angeles itself became an infection vector in the fall that Wallace finally began paying attention. The studios were closing down, and even Norton’s production company was going on hiatus—Norton himself had suddenly disappeared for parts unknown without so much as a goodbye. But in Rancho Palos Verdes, it was easy to think nothing untoward was going on. Life was pretty much as it had always been in the Southland, and this far away from the city, change wasn’t readily apparent. But when Wallace emerged from the house one morning to pick up the newspaper—it wasn’t there—he looked out over the front lawn of the house across the street. The Pacific Ocean could be seen, blue and regal as always, framed by a great sweeping view of the Los Angeles coastline. Plumes of smoke rose into the air from several points, in Playa del Rey, Santa Monica, and even out toward the colony of Malibu. A line of Army Black Hawk helicopters thudded across the sky in a staggered formation. More worrisome, morning sunlight glinted off the flat canopies of their Apache escorts. Wallace recognized both helicopter types from working alongside Army National Guard during his time with the USBP. As he stood there, taking in the vista, he heard sirens from somewhere inside his own neighborhood. Not just a few. But many.

What the fuck?

It lands on May 30, folks!

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  1. Alex
    May 20, 2017 at 12:33 am

    cool

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